the north face sleeping bags Family pay tribute to SAS legend Brummie Stokes

the north face ski jacket Family pay tribute to SAS legend Brummie Stokes

ONE of the most famous members of Hereford’s SAS regiment, who scaled the heights of Everest and helped hundreds of children realise their potential, has died at the age of 70.

John ‘Brummie’ Stokes remained active on leaving the army by setting up the Taste for Adventure centre in Credenhill with his wife, Lynn, in 1991.

She said: “You couldn’t help but laugh at Brum. He was a very large character with a large personality and a large heart. He always wanted to help people.”

Samuel said: “It is to show less privileged children that there is more to life and they are capable of more if they are willing to step through that door.”

Brummie was awarded an MBE in 2004 in recognition of his work.

Lynn, 58, said he could talk to anybody and was very inspirational.

She added: “He touched a lot of people’s lives all over the country. Young people, they didn’t forget him. He was like a magnet really. They loved his stories.

“He was just lovely to listen to and that is what I will miss the most the stories.”

The couple met when Lynn worked at the Oxford Arms in Widemarsh Street in 1977.

She said persistence, flowers and cards won her over and they started dating before they married in Hereford’s registry office in 1981.

Brummie loved being a grandad to Arthur, who is 14 months old and the son of Samuel and his wife, Emily. Benjamin and his wife, Lori, live in Bournemouth.

Samuel said: “Dad was a giver, he would just give everything it was just unconditional. He wouldn’t ask questions. All we had to do was ask and it was done. Especially with his time, he was not selfish with his time.”

Benjamin added: “He conquered more than mountains.”

Brummie was diagnosed in 2001 with a lung disease called cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis and was told he only had two to five years to live.

The family have been overwhelmed by the tributes to Brummie and thanked everybody for their kind words.

Samuel said: “His words were ‘You can be your wildest dreams.'”

Brummie Stokes’ funeral service will be held at Hereford Cathedral from noon on January 22.

They waited for their operations to amputate their toes for three months, after which they had to learn to walk, run and climb again, with only half their feet.

And in 1984, Brummie returned to climb the north face of Everest. An avalanche wiped out the base camp, killing one of the team members and injuring several others. Brummie suffered a broken neck.

After leaving the army in 1985, he obtained a permit from the Chinese to climb the north east ridge of Everest, the only remaining unclimbed route on the mountain.

But, in 1986, at 26,000ft, they were forced to abandon their assault owing to abnormally hazardous weather conditions.

He completed the north east, unclimbed section of the ridge of Mount Everest, but unfortunately suffered three attacks of cerebral oedema, which partially paralysed him.

Lynn said: “There was something special about the mountains for Brummie and Everest was the one for him.”

Brummie outlines many of his challenges in a book, Soldiers Sherpas’ A Taste For Adventure, which is available by contacting the Taste for Adventure Centre through its on Facebook.
the north face sleeping bags Family pay tribute to SAS legend Brummie Stokes

the north face daypack Family of teen wants answers after deadly South Bend crash and shooting

the north face wallet Family of teen wants answers after deadly South Bend crash and shooting

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the north face daypack Family of teen wants answers after deadly South Bend crash and shooting

the north face womens Family of slain North Lake College student want answers

the north face jacket Family of slain North Lake College student want answers

Janeera Gonzalez family says losing a daughter is hard enough. They say the lack of communication from police and college officials is adding to their pain.

Gonzalez was gunned down Wednesday at North Lake College before the shooter turned the gun on himself. Since then, her family says Irving police and college officials have been tight lipped.

Friday, they held a news conference led by community activist Carlos Quintanilla outside their Irving home. They called for answers and demanded a face to face meeting with North Lake College president or the chancellor of the Dallas County Community College District.

“I want justice,” said Lucy Gonzalez, Janeera mother. “I want answers. I need somebody to give me answers. I want to see my daughter.”

They said the Irving police chief had reached out Friday morning to schedule a face to face meeting that day.

North Lake president Dr. Christa Slejko reached out to Gonzalez brother on social media Friday morning and he was able to contact her back, according to Ann Hatch, a spokeswoman for DCCCD. Hatch added the two could set up a meeting if they chose to do so.

“We know that the community outpouring of support reflects how North Lake students and employees feel, too,” said Hatch in a written statement. “Many faculty and staff members at the college are remembering Janeera as a bright and special young woman. She truly was part of the North Lake College family.”

Hatch added that the college opened access to a site for a memorial Friday morning near the library for Janeera.

They are small steps forward for a grieving family.

“There is a lot of anger in my heart,” Gonzalez said. “I will never see my daughter again. She was my best friend. She was the most beautiful soul. Anybody can tell you that.”

The family said police detectives hasn returned their calls since the shooting.

They want to know more about the investigation and more about the college security measures. They also want to know where the shooter, Adrian Torres, got his gun and how he got on campus and found their daughter, who they say he was obsessed with.
the north face womens Family of slain North Lake College student want answers

blacks the north face Family of North Sydney woman ‘angry’ over drug crisis

the north face triclimate Family of North Sydney woman ‘angry’ over drug crisis

Vince Garnier of Bedford, speaking on behalf of his mother who did not wish to be interviewed said she was transported to hospital by ambulance four times in October for similar symptoms and general malaise.

On her last trip to hospital on Oct. 13, after nearly passing out at home, an emergency room doctor told the family that Sharon should never have been issued Avelox due to its adverse interaction with her other medications, warfarin and sotalol.

Garnier said his mother was then diagnosed with Long QT Syndrome, a condition that causes fast, chaotic heartbeats, sudden onset of weakness and fainting, and, in some cases, death.

He said prescriptions for warfarin and sotalol, taken in relation to a stroke Sharon suffered 13 years ago, were also being filled at the North Sydney pharmacy.

“The antibiotic that the pharmacist gave my mother interacted not just with one of her medications, but with both,” said Vince Garnier. “And the (adverse health) classification was major for both, not mild or moderate, but major for both.

“My father broke down crying; he thought my mother was going to die.

After hearing no response, they later increased their request to include a $500 donation to the Heart Stroke Foundation in Nova Scotia.

The family is now considering legal action and has been in contact with Walmart’s corporate headquarters.

“I believe there should be some responsibility and some accountability, and I’m not honestly sure we can get that by handling it quietly with Walmart lawyers,” said Garnier, a former police officer. “I think the public has a right to know.”

A Walmart lawyer was expected to call Garnier on Friday.

A complaint has also been launched with the Nova Scotia College of Pharmacists, the regulatory body that governs pharmacy in the province.

College deputy registrar Bev Zwicker said once a complaint is received, it is investigated thoroughly.

Zwicker said privacy regulations under the provincial Pharmacy Act prevent her from speaking on the specifics of individual complaints.

“We’ve made it very clear both in the legislation and in the standards of practice that one of the essential and critical roles of a pharmacist is to determine the appropriateness of drug therapy and that would include identifying if there are any drug related problems, so that the pharmacist is satisfied that it is appropriate for this person to receive this medication,” said Zwicker.

Lorna Devoe, the pharmacist the Garniers claim gave them the problematic prescription refused comment on the matter when contacted by The Chronicle Herald on Friday.

Alex Robertson, Wal Mart’s director of corporate affairs in Quebec, also declined to comment.

“For privacy reasons I can’t comment on any discussions that we’ve had with the family, and because this is a legal matter I can’t get into any of the details at this time,” he said.
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the north face.co.uk Family of Falmouth woman who died of cancer raising funds to save her home

the north face top Family of Falmouth woman who died of cancer raising funds to save her home

NORTH YARMOUTH, Maine The family of a woman who died last month from breast cancer is raising money to buy her former business and keep her ancestral Falmouth home in the family.

Linda Polkey from undiagnosed and untreated cancer. The disease struck quickly, shocking family and friends, according to her niece, Jennifer Noyes.

hate that she gone and never really knew how many lives that she really touched and made better, Noyes said Monday. have so much frustration that she struggled so in silence, financially and physically, and never asked for help in any way but continued to give daily of herself and gave words of encouragement to others and us until the very end.

kind of looking for a way to keep [the property] sustainable by the community, Noyes said.

Although the store property attracted an offer from a buyer,
the north face.co.uk Family of Falmouth woman who died of cancer raising funds to save her home
was so far below property value that we thought we just going to try to do this fundraiser and and see what people in the community can put together, she said.

The funds also would allow Polkey Longwoods Road home in Falmouth, which she struggled to afford after her parents died, to remain in the family, Noyes said.

If the effort fails to reach its goal, the family at least would like to install a bench memorial to Polkey, perhaps near the ocean, where she enjoyed sitting, her aunt said.
the north face.co.uk Family of Falmouth woman who died of cancer raising funds to save her home

the north face size chart uk Four locked up for leaving victim scarred in mob attack with iron bar in Neal Street

the north face 3in1 jacket Four locked up for leaving victim scarred in mob attack with iron bar in Neal Street

Idress, of Grantham Terrace, Iqbal, of Kingswood Street, Khan, of Ryan Street, and Siddique, of Southmere Drive, all pleaded guilty to a charge of affray.

Mr Moore said of their basis of plea: “It is accepted that in the course of this joint enterprise offence, a bar was produced and used.”

Mr Bashir added that Idress, who was studying an undergraduate degree in law, acknowledged he had thrown away his future in that profession,
the north face size chart uk Four locked up for leaving victim scarred in mob attack with iron bar in Neal Street
but described him as an “industrious” young man who had shown genuine remorse.

Emma Downing, for Iqbal, said her client had accepted his role in the “mindless violence,” for which he was “thoroughly ashamed and disappointed in himself”. She said he had been suspended from his college course upon being arrested and charged, but had since started working part time and re started his studies in Leeds.

Mohammed Nawaz, for Khan, said his client accepted his “absolutely disgraceful behaviour,” which had also seen him expelled from college, but argued that he had acted out of character.

Lorraine Harris, mitigating for Saddique, described the incident as a “horrific example of peer pressure and misplaced loyalties”. She said her client had lost his good reputation, but was now back in education and part time work away from Bradford.
the north face size chart uk Four locked up for leaving victim scarred in mob attack with iron bar in Neal Street

the north face backpack Four from Hammonds Plains face charges after 10

the north face daypack Four from Hammonds Plains face charges after 10

Fourteen people face a total of 48 charges after a 10 month trafficking investigation in Lunenburg County, tied to the Halifax Regional Municipality.

Yesterday around 100 officers arrested 10 people and conducted 8 residential search warrants, seizing powder and crack cocaine, prescription pills, marijuana, grow op equipment, cash and firearms.

results of Operation Hamlin will have a direct impact on Lunenburg County, as it has dismantled a main supply of illicit drugs to our streets, said Supt. Sylvie Bourassa Muise, RCMP District Policing Officer, Southwest Nova District. have a devastating impact on our community and after today, we expect to see an immediate reduction of these drugs available locally. investigation is ongoing and police anticipate additional arrests and charges

RCMP say the following four individuals will be appearing at Halifax Provincial Court todaycharged with the following:

Brian Anthony Gough, 47, Hammonds Plains

Trafficking Crack Cocaine x 3

Failure to comply with condition of undertaking / recognizance x 8

Possession of Crack Cocaine for the Purpose of Trafficking

Alden Norman Oliver, 51, Hammonds Plains

Trafficking Crack Cocaine x 3

Possession of Crack Cocaine for the Purpose of Trafficking

Farron Daryl Simms, 48, Hammonds Plains

Trafficking Crack Cocaine x 3

Possession of Crack Cocaine for the Purpose of Trafficking

Sean Robert Simms, 43, Hammonds Plains

Trafficking Crack Cocaine x 2

Mounties say the following nine individuals will be appearing at Bridgewater Provincial Court today on the following charges:
the north face backpack Four from Hammonds Plains face charges after 10

the north face sale Four face federal charges in Elmira drug investigation

the north face zephyr triclimate jacket Four face federal charges in Elmira drug investigation

Attorney for the Western District James P. Kennedy Jr. joined federal, state and local law enforcement officials at an Elmira City Hall news conference Wednesday morning to announce the arrests, which took place Tuesday andresult from a year long investigation.

U 47700 is a synthetic opioid pain medication also known on the streets as “pink” or “pinky”.

Robert Thatcher (Photo: ELMIRA POLICE DEPARTMENT PHOTO)

Thatcher and Sams were also charged with possession of firearms in furtherance of a drug trafficking ring. Banks is additionally charged with possessing with intent to distribute, and distributing furanyl fentanyl and U 47700.

Investigators are working to determine if any overdose deaths can be tied to the distribution ring, Kennedy said. If there is a link, additional federal charges can be brought, he said.

“These are dangerous drugs we’re dealing with,” Kennedy said. “People have access to different drugs that are causing overdose deaths. The investigation was begun over a year ago by the Elmira Police Department. We were contacted by Elmira police and New York state police. We added our capability to conduct the investigation. We made a number of (narcotic) purchases.”

Buy PhotoElmira Police Chief Joseph Kane urges residents to be part of the solution by speaking up about criminal activity. (Photo: Kelly Gampel / Staff Photo)

One unusual aspect of the investigation seems to be a connection to North Carolina, where some of the narcotics manufactured in Elmira ended up, Kennedy said.

Dwayne Banks (Photo: ELMIRA POLICE DEPARTMENT PHOTO)

Kennedy couldn’t comment on the possibility of additional arrests, and would only confirm the investigation is ongoing.

Officers seized more than 200 blue pills suspected to contain the controlled substances, seven firearms and ammunition, a bulletproof vest and other items.

Elmira Police Chief Joseph Kane said he couldn’t comment on what initially led police to look into the opioid ring.

But Kane said the success of the investigation underscores the importance of community involvement in law enforcement efforts, along with strong cooperation across a broad spectrum of law enforcement agencies.

“We’ve had several overdoses, significant problems with opioids and several shootings,” Kane said. “This is one of the solutions to that. We’ve worked with state and federal parties and made significant arrests. I encourage (residents) to get involved. Please call us so we can work together.”

Carlito Rios (Photo: ELMIRA POLICE DEPARTMENT PHOTO)

The suspects manufactured “tens of thousands” of tablets containing furanyl fentanyl and sold them to street level customers since last November, according to the criminal complaint.

Searches were conducted Tuesday at 23 Somerset Drive, 457 Livingston St. and 327 W. Clinton St. in Elmira, 2063 Chambers Road in Beaver Dams, and 604 S. Lehigh Ave. in Sayre.

“We want the public to be aware these pills are deadly,” said Matthew Ramarge, Drug Enforcement Administration resident agent in charge of the Rochester office. “This was a pretty sophisticated organization. Attorney William Hochul announced charges against eight people in connection with a heroin ring that stretched from Elmira to Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

HEROIN RING: Police arrest 8 in Elmira investigation

All of the suspects made initial appearances Tuesday in federal court in Rochester. Rios was released on bail, and the other three are in federal custody, Kennedy said.

Buy PhotoKevin Kelly, deputy special agent in charge of Homeland Security investigations out of Buffalo, says the “significant” case involving the drug trafficking by an Elmira group will not only be pursued on a domestic level but on an international level. Four men three from Elmira and one from Beaver Dams were arrested recently for their suspected involvement in a drug trafficking ring based in Elmira. (Photo: Kelly Gampel / Staff Photo)

Buy PhotoMatthew Ramarge, DEA resident agent in charge for Rochester, details that “tens of thousands of (furanyl fentanyl and U 47700) pills were being distributed throughout the community” during a news conference Wednesday at Elmira City Hall. (Photo: Kelly Gampel / Staff Photo)
the north face sale Four face federal charges in Elmira drug investigation

the north face cheshire oaks Four face charges in fight at cemetery

the north face hat Four face charges in fight at cemetery

Four men face charges stemming from an altercation over $40 that ended in gunplay at Fairview Cemetery.

William J. Ray Jr., 24, of 1016 18th Ave.; Michael A. Luciano Jr., 22, of 110 E. Third Ave.; Devon V. Lake, 21, of 309 First Ave.; and William J. Hollen, 23, of 760 Loop Road, Hollidaysburg, are all charged with felony and misdemeanor charges that include criminal conspiracy, aggravated assault and recklessly endangering another person.

The incident took place nearly a year ago, on Feb. 17, at the cemetery. Warrants for the men arrests were issued Dec. 13. This week, three of the four suspects were arraigned on their charges with only Hollen still at large.

Luciano and Hollen also are charged with firearm not to be carried without a license, and Luciano is charged with possession of a small amount of marijuana. Feb. 17, when Altoona police officers were dispatched to the cemetery for a report of shots fired and encountered Luciano and another man, who was allegedly a witness to the incident but is not facing charges.

According to police, Luciano hands were covered in blood, and there was blood on his pants. Luciano had a black 9 mm Arsenal Makorov handgun, for which he had a bill of sale, concealed under his jacket in a holster. Police said Luciano did not have a concealed carry permit.

A check of the area by officers turned up blood spatter and three spent shell casings in the south end of the cemetery.

Luciano said he didn want to talk to officers but did admit he had a bag of marijuana in his boot.

The witness told police he wanted to talk and told police, just walked into this, and I don want any part of it, according to the charges.

Police said the witness said he met up with Luciano earlier in the evening, and their plan was to go to a party. Luciano said before the party, he and some other friends had to care of some business, which the witness didn think much about at the time. After the pair walked to the Chestnut Avenue Sheetz store, they met Ray, Lake and Hollen.

The witness told police Ray and Hollen seemed drunk and repeatedly sent texts to a man whose brother owed Lake $40.

Police would learn later from that man that he and Lake were friends, and he planned to meet Lake at Sheetz to talk about the debt,
the north face cheshire oaks Four face charges in fight at cemetery
but when he arrived at the store, Lake was nowhere to be seen.

The man said after he got to Sheetz, he received a text message telling him to meet at Fairview Cemetery.

The witness told police that the group walked up to the cemetery as a short cut to get to the party on the 2200 block of Ninth Street. Just after they started walking through the cemetery, a dark colored Ford Explorer drove into the cemetery and parked.

As the SUV parked, Hollen allegedly told Luciano, on, Mikey, flash the piece so he knows we are hard and we mean business.

the piece so he sees that we are thug. Let him see that we are gangster, Hollen allegedly continued to tell Luciano.

According to the story told to police by the witness, the victim got out of the SUV and shook hands with Lake and the two started talking. The witness told police it was a normal conversation, and while Ray and the witness who was not charged stood near Lake and the victim, Hollen and Luciano were hiding among the trees and tombstones.

At this point, the witness said Ray started trying to antagonize the victim, and when the victim turned to face Ray, Hollen ran out from hiding and struck the victim in the forehead with the butt of a gun.

Police said the witness told them that Ray grabbed the victim by the arm while Hollen punched and began wrestling with him.

The alleged victim later told the investigating detective that he was dazed after he was hit by the butt of the gun. With his head bleeding profusely, he said he found himself blinded by blood in one eye and being grabbed after he lunged at Hollen, who was standing in front of him with the handgun leveled at his head.

When the victim broke free, Hollen allegedly started firing the gun at him.

When police talked to the alleged victim, he told the detective that as he ran after breaking free, he heard three gunshots aimed in his direction and heard Hollen yell, going to (expletive deleted) kill you. victim ran toward his parked SUV, near the entrance to the cemetery, while Hollen fired shots at him, which were also in the direction of UPMC Altoona.

The witness told police that when Hollen started shooting, he ran north through the cemetery, and a couple of minutes later, Luciano caught up with him. The witness told police that Luciano now had the gun, that his hands were bloody and that he was to return to where the shooting took place because he wanted to pick up the spent shell casings, Altoona police Detective Cpl. Terry Merritts noted in the charges.

have to get those casings. Otherwise, they will do ballistics on them and figure out that they belong to my gun, Luciano allegedly told the witness.

When Luciano walked back toward where the gun had been fired, he was confronted by Altoona police officers and taken into custody.

Luciano was arraigned Saturday and jailed but on Monday posted 10 percent of $75,000 bail. Ray was also arraigned Saturday and placed in Blair County Prison in lieu of 10 percent of $75,000. He was released on Wednesday after posting bail. His was the only photo available from the Blair County Prison. Lake turned himself in Tuesday for arraignment on the charges and was released on an unsecured $25,
the north face cheshire oaks Four face charges in fight at cemetery
000 bond. Hollen remains at large.

the north face nuptse jacket mens Four elephants stall highway 69 traffic in Eufaula

the north face fleeces Four elephants stall highway 69 traffic in Eufaula

Highway 69 traffic on Wednesday after the commercial vehicle transporting them stalled and caused an outside lane of traffic to shut down.

The Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported an outside lane was blocked to allow a local veterinarian to transport the elephants to a secondary trailer before getting them back on the road to Iowa.

Dr. Mike Voss and his wife, Faye Voss, of Voss Veterinary Clinic in Checotah, helped transport the elephants after receiving a call from D’s Wrecker Service, of Checotah,
the north face nuptse jacket mens Four elephants stall highway 69 traffic in Eufaula
to request a cattle trailer.

“We went and picked them up,” Faye Voss said. “A gentleman that works at the cattle company for my husband took them to unload them.”

The elephants were transported by cattle trailer to Checotah ranch Voss Cattle Co., which is owned by the Voss family.

Faye Voss said the elephants stayed at the location until the animal’s handlers were able to arrange transportation to Iowa.

“The elephants were in good condition and they were not hurt,” Faye Voss said.

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